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CITY OF SOUTH BEND - COUNCIL MEETING - July 23, 2018

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1-2. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

The council meeting was called to order by Mayor Struck at 5:30 pm followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Members present: Councilor Buchanan, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Davis, Councilor Little, Police Chief Eastham and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts City Supervisor Houk was absent.

3. APPROVAL OF AGENDA, CONSENT AGENDA, AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES

A motion was made by Councilor Neve to approve the Agenda, Consent Agenda and the minutes of the July 9, 2018 regular meeting. The motion was seconded by Councilor Davis. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

Vendors – Check #44252 thru Check #44279 - $35,146.73

4. CORRESPONDENCE

The City received a letter from Kathy Bale, 174 Airport Road, Raymond, WA 98577 which was addressed to the council but because the letter was not received in time to be included in the councilor’s packets Clerk/Treasurer Roberts read the letter for the record. The letter addressed Ms. Bale’s desire for the city to not increase the utility tax which is currently purposed and thanked Councilor Davis and Councilor Buchanan for suggesting the tax increase be tabled. After reading the letter Clerk/Treasurer Roberts noted that Ms. Bale does not live inside the city limits so she does not pay the city excise tax nor would she be affected by the increase.

5. PUBLIC HEARING @ 5:34 PM – SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN

Mayor Struck opened the public hearing at 5:34 pm. Mayor Struck presented the Six Year Transportation Improvement Plan – 2019-2024:

Project
Title

Project
Description

Road
Name

Begin
Termini

End
Termini

Phase Start Date

Willapa Avenue

Sidewalk Installation

Willapa Avenue

First Street

Rixon Road

2019

Adams Street

Road Reconstruction

Adams Street

Highway 101

Water Street

2019

Pacific Avenue

Road Reconstruction & widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage

Pacific Avenue

West 4th Avenue

First Street

2020

Washington Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

Washington Street

Water Street

East 3rd Street

2021

Madison Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

Madison Street

Highway 101

First Street

2022

Jefferson Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

Jefferson Street

Highway 101

First Street

2023

First Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

First Street

A Street

C Street

2023

First Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

First Street

Jackson Street

Harrison Street

2024

Jackson Street

Road reconstruction and widening, add sidewalk on one side. Storm drainage.

Jackson Street

Oregon Avenue

Montana Avenue

2024

There was no public comment and the public hearing was closed at 5:38pm.

6. RESOLUTION #2018-05 – ADOPTING THE SIX YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN – 2019-2024

Councilor Neve made a motion to accept Resolution #2018-05 – Adopting the Six Year Transportation Improvement Plan – 2019-2024 as presented. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams.

During discussion Councilor Buchanan asked if these projects usually happen and Mayor Struck explained that no, not necessarily. It depends on how much money is appropriated and how well each project ranks among all of the other projects on their list. South Bend has been very fortunate over the years to get at least a project or two funded through the Transportation Improvement Board.

7. ORDINANCE #1533 – UTILITY EXCISE TAX INCREASE (2%) (SECOND READING)

Councilor Neve made a motion to approve Ordinance #1533 – Utility Excise Tax Increase (2%) as presented. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams.

During discussion Councilor Buchanan noted that he had been approached about public safety and he feels that everything is public safety, not just the police department. He is still adamant that the police department is overstaffed. Councilor Davis explained that she had come to city hall and spoke with Clerk/Treasurer Roberts who explained some of the potential savings that would be obtained if the city follows through with outsourcing of their garbage services and how those savings would reduce the impact that the 2% utility tax increase would have for the majority of the residential customers. Vote: Ayes-4, Noes-1, Absent-0 (Ayes – Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Davis, Councilor Little. Noes – Councilor Buchanan)

8. RESOLUTION #2018-06 – COMCAST FRANCHISE AGREEMENT

Councilor Neve made a motion to accept Resolution #2018-06 – Comcast Franchise Agreement as presented. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

9. ITEMS FROM THE PUBLIC

Citizens Sandy & Curt Harris from 515 Pacific Avenue questioned the financial effectiveness of the city’s mosquito program. Ms. Harris felt like, even though she opts out of the spraying, the person handling the city’s spraying was wasting the spray when he was driving around just letting it “billow out”. A brief discussion about the mosquito program and how it has evolved and improved over the years followed.

Citizen Chris Thompson from 211 S Jackson thanked the council for listening to the community and lowering the utility tax increase from 5% to 2% but now it is time to make cuts to the budget.

10. DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS

None

11. MAYOR’S REPORT

Mayor Struck asked the council, as part of the Labor Day Committee, for permission to set up a beer garden at Cheney Park and near Highway 101 and Willapa during the Come Play on Labor Day celebration. Councilor Neve made a motion authorizing a beer garden at Cheney Park and near Highway 101 and Willapa over Labor Day Weekend. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

Mayor Struck spoke about a recent publication that was sent out by MRSC – “Action Outside a Public Meeting, What Could Possibly Go Wrong?” Each of the councilors received a copy and Mayor Struck read briefly from the publication. “…A meeting can also occur sequentially, over time, if enough members to make a quorum collectively discuss or act upon an issue outside a public meeting. For example, board member A speaks to board member B about board business and then B discusses the prior conversations with board member C. Once a quorum has participated and shared information, a meeting has occurred. If notice of the meeting was not given and the public not allowed to attend, the Open Public Meeting Act (OPMA) is violated.” “…Members of the legislative body who knowingly violate the OPMA are subject to a $500 penalty or, for a subsequent violation, $1,000. The jurisdiction itself may be required to pay attorney fees and costs in addition to the legal expense of defending its actions. A violation can also serve as a basis for recall.”

12. COUNCIL COMMENTS
  • Councilor Buchanan defended his no vote and believes that the budget needs a drastic change. The police department is the biggest chunk of the budget.
  • Councilor Williams wanted to make sure that everyone knows that the outsourcing of the city’s garbage service is not a done deal until the council approves the agreement and a contract is signed no matter what the paper says.
13. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:06 PM to meet again at 5:30 PM on Monday, August 13, 2018 for the next regularly scheduled meeting at South Bend City Hall.

CITY OF SOUTH BEND - COUNCIL MEETING - July 9, 2018

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1-2. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

The council meeting was called to order by Mayor Struck at 5:30 pm followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Members present: Councilor Buchanan, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Davis, Councilor Little, Police Chief Eastham, City Supervisor Houk and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts.

3. APPROVAL OF AGENDA, CONSENT AGENDA, AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES

A motion was made by Councilor Neve to approve the Agenda, Consent Agenda and the minutes of the June 25, 2018 regular meeting. The motion was seconded by Councilor Willliams. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

Vendors – Check #44215 thru Check #44251 - $96,446.65

Payroll - Check #24457 thru Check #24470 - $96,275.33 Including Direct Deposit

4. CORRESPONDENCE

None

5. ORDINANCE #1533 – UTILITY TAX INCREASE (2%) – FIRST READING

Councilor Williams made a motion to move Ordinance #1533 – Utility Tax Increase (2%) to a second reading. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams.

During discussion Councilor Neve reiterated her desire to keep the utility tax increase at 5% instead of lowering it to 2% and continuing the slow and painful inevitability of the tax not creating a reserve to help protect current expense in the future. Councilor Little explained that he had talked to his circle of citizens and they felt like that 2% was doable as opposed to the full 5% on a fixed income. Councilor Davis felt like the city should work on the 2019 budget first and table any tax increase until after the 2019 budget was adopted. Councilor Buchanan also was opposed to any tax increase. Mayor Struck asked that the council look at the 2nd quarter budget report (page A) which shows the beginning fund balance in current expense as of January 1, 2018 of $89,759, the revenues at the end of June $549,761, the expenditures at the end of June $567,356 which leaves an ending fund balance of $72,164 as of June 30, 2018. That is a 19.6% decline for the half year in revenues. Councilor Buchanan again expressed his desire to cut a position from the police department. He believes that the department is overstaffed and that there needs to be some belt tightening. Councilor Little responded that in his opinion the city is not over staffed in the police department. Councilor Williams also spent some time speaking with citizens and he also received the same feedback that people felt that 2 to 2 ½% would be an acceptable increase. Councilor Little pointed out that the utility tax increase has not be raised since 1992 – it is 2018! The city has to keep up with the times!

Vote: Ayes-3, Noes-2, Absent-0 
(Ayes – Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Little. Noes – Councilor Buchanan, Councilor Davis)

6. ITEMS FROM THE PUBLIC

Citizen Steve Rogers from 510 W. Second Street feels like there needs to be a community discussion about fireworks.

Mr. Rogers then spoke regarding a 42’ tugboat that the Willapa Harbor Sea-Scouts are looking to find a place to moor. He wanted the city council to consider permanent moorage at the city’s recreational dock. He mentioned all of the good things happening in South Bend and what a great public draw the tugboat would be. Mayor Struck explained that she and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts had worked at length on this very issue with South Bend Superintendent Jon Tienhaara last year. The city’s recreational dock was funded by a grant and the contract associated with that grant specifically prohibits permanent or long term moorage at the recreational dock. There is an appeal process that would allow for 9 months of moorage each year and it would have to be appealed each year, but Mr. Tienhaara didn’t want to pursue it. This is out of the city’s hands. The funding agency is Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office and they made it very clear that the city was obligated to abide by the contract unless they wanted to pay the grant ($562,148) back. Mr. Rogers was frustrated by this answer and asked Mayor Struck if she would mind if he spoke with the state legislators to see if they could help facilitate a change to the contract. Mayor Struck advised she was fine with that.

7. DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS
  • Police Chief Eastham reported that traffic has been a bit of a pain due to the start of the road construction on Highway 101 through town, but it is being dealt with. Once paving starts it will happen again and will be dealt with the same way. Mayor Struck noted that the paving will be done at night which should help the traffic issue.
  • Police Chief Eastham felt that there was probably about the same amount of fireworks complaints over the 4th of July holiday, but unofficially there were many more than usual. He attributed that to the holiday being in the middle of the week and the little bit of rain we had gave people an unrealistic feeling that things were not as dry as they really were. Following a lengthy discussion Police Chief Eastham will look over the city’s current fireworks ordinance and see if there is a way to improve his ability to enforce violators.
  • Police Chief Eastham emotionally noted that a young person had taken her life the night before and it had been a very difficult day for his officers, first responders, and hospital staff as well as for the many people that knew and loved her.
  • City Supervisor Houk noted that the crew has been working on a couple of water leaks and that he hopes to get the sewer pump at pump station #1 taken care of soon. These projects are very difficult to do when the crew is shorthanded due to vacations.
  • City Supervisor Houk noted that he and Mayor Struck will be meeting with Gray & Osborne, Inc. on Wednesday, July 11th to discuss the 4th Street Reconstruction Project which will be funded by a Community Development Block Grant. The project should go out to bid the week of July 16th, the bid awarded the last week of July and the project would start around the 4th of September 2018. Councilor Little expressed concern about starting a project that late in the season but City Supervisor Houk assured him that the project is only scheduled to last approximately 5 weeks and it does not have a lot of infrastructure work associated with it.
  • Councilor Little asked City Supervisor Houk if any of the cutting out of the ADA ramps that is being done on Highway 101 as part of the current construction will compromise the work that the city did at Highway 101 and Memorial to prevent leakage into the building at 724 W. Robert Bush Drive (103 Memorial). City Supervisor Houk does not think there will be any issues but he will check on it.
  • Clerk/Treasurer Roberts advised that the garbage services contract with LeMays of Grays Harbor will be on the July 23, 2018 agenda. Due to the holiday they were not able to get the contract prepared like they had hoped to.
8. MAYOR’S REPORT
  • Mayor Struck advised that she and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts had attended the Association of Washington Cities (AWC) annual conference in Yakima the previous week. As always it was a great event. She also noted that they will both be heading to SeaTac the evening of Wednesday, July 18th to attend an AWC Trust Governance Retreat on Thursday, July 19th. All expenses – including mileage is paid by AWC because they both sit on various AWC boards or committee’s.
  • Mayor Struck reminded everyone of the upcoming Candidates Forum’s. Willapacific Branch of the American Association of University Women will host a Candidate Forum at the Ilwaco High School on Tuesday, July 10th starting at 6:30 pm. It will include the PUD Commissioners, Prosecuting Attorneys, County Commissioners and the Sheriff. North County’s Candidate Forum hosted by the Raymond Theater will be held at the theater as follows: Monday, July 16th at 6:00 pm – 19th Legislative District, Wednesday, July 18th at 6:00 pm – Prosecutor & Sheriff and Thursday, July 19th at 6:00 pm – Pacific County Commissioners.
9. COUNCIL COMMENTS
  • Councilor Neve noted that July 3rd was much worse as far as fireworks were concerned than July 4th – at least in her neighborhood.
  • Councilor Neve pointed out that she is amazed by the amount of people that stop at the new business across from the museum/visitors center. Willapa Bay Fine Arts Association – Riverside Gallery is located at 1015 W. Robert Bush Drive and they had a tremendous amount of foot traffic over the weekend! People love art!
10. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:22 PM to meet again at 5:30 PM on Monday, July 23, 2018 for the next regularly scheduled meeting at South Bend City Hall.

CITY OF SOUTH BEND - COUNCIL MEETING - July 24, 2017
1-2. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

The council meeting was called to order by Mayor Struck at 5:30 pm followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Members present: Councilor Kuiken, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Police Chief Eastham, City Supervisor Houk, Michael Tierney (Tierney & Correa, P.C.), Assistance Fire Chief McGee and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts.

3. APPROVAL OF AGENDA, CONSENT AGENDA, AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES

A motion was made by Councilor Neve to approve the Agenda, Consent Agenda and the minutes of the July 10, 2017 regular meeting. The motion was seconded by Councilor Williams. Vote: Ayes-3, Noes-0, Absent-2

Vendors – Check #43177 thru Check #43212 - $70,671.39

4. CORRESPONDENCE

Mayor Struck read two messages regarding the Legislatures recent failure to pass a capital budget.

The Association of Washington Cities noted that critical funding for city projects appropriated through the capital budget included:

  • Public Works Trust Fund – Legislators were poised to fund a Public Works Trust Fund loan list for the first time since the 2011-2013 budget
  • Department of Ecology’s water quality grants and loans
  • Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund
  • Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program grants
  • Housing Trust Fund
  • Behavioral health facilities
  • Numerous other projects important to individual cities

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) noted, “If you have been following the disappointing news from Olympia, you know that the legislature did not pass a capital budget before the end of their 3rd special session.” They also said that if the city has a project or contract that was expected to funded in the near term, all of those are on hold until they receive a capital budget or until they get authority to spend any federal funds they were expecting. Mayor Struck explained that the city does have an application with RCO for Pioneer Park. There was some doubt if it would be funded as the project did not end up high on the ranking list but there have been some years when all projects have been funded.

5. PUBLIC HEARING @ 5:33 PM – SIX-YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR 2018 THROUGH 2023

Mayor Struck opened the public hearing at 5:33 pm. She read the proposed project schedule:

2018
First Street (Weir street to kendrick street)
Kendrick Street (Highway 101 to First Street)

2019
WEST 4TH STREET (WILLAPA AVENUE TO PACIFIC AVENUE)

2020
ADAMS STREET (HIGHWAY 101 TO WATER STREET)
PACIFIC AVENUE (WEST 4TH AVENUE TO FIRST STREET)

2021
WASHINGTON STREET (WATER STREET TO EAST 3RD STREET)
MADISON STREET (HIGHWAY 101 TO FIRST STREET)

2022
JEFFERSON STREET (HIGHWAY 101 TO FIRST STREET)
FIRST STREET (A STREET TO C STREET)

2023
FIRST STREET (JACKSON STREET TO HARRISON STREET)
JACKSON STREET (OREGON AVENUE TO MONTANA AVENUE)

Citizen Daryl Buchanan asked if these were grant funded projects and Mayor Struck explained that these are only PROPOSED projects by the city. They are not funded at all yet. The city will apply for grant funding but there is not guarantee they will be funded. He asked if there is a match and Mayor Struck noted that each project does have a match but each one is different based on the amount of funding that is required to do the project.

There was no additional public comment. The public hearing was closed at 5:37 pm.

6. RESOLUTION #2017-03 – SIX-YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR 2018 THROUGH 2023

Councilor Williams made a motion to accept Resolution #2017-03 – Six-Year Transportation Improvement Plan for 2018 through 2023 as presented. The motion was seconded by Councilor Neve. Vote: Ayes-3, Noes-0, Absent-2

7. ITEMS FROM THE PUBLIC

Citizen Daryl Buchanan announced that there will be a rails to trails meeting at the Grays Harbor College in Raymond on Wednesday, July 26th beginning at 5:30 pm. The group will be discussing the need for trail repairs from Raymond to Menlo.

8. DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS
  • Police Chief Eastham gave a brief department update noting that there is a lot of “mind numbing” traffic right now. Police Chief Eastham also explained that he was just notified that the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Center reimbursed the police department $20,836.82 for manpower replacement while Officer Gonzalez and Officer Jo where at the police academy which was very welcome news.
  • City Supervisor Houk mentioned that the carts for the new garbage truck will be arriving on Tuesday, July 25th.
  • City Supervisor Houk advised that he did a walk around with Gray & Osborne, Inc. and a representative from the Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) looking at the various projects on the city’s six-year road plan that the city hopes to get funded.
  • City Supervisor Houk advised that he has the speed limit sign for Pacific Avenue and it will be going up soon. (See July 10, 2017 Council Minutes)
  • City Supervisor Houk noted the Emergency Pavement Repair Project funded by TIB is just awaiting the signatures of the contractor and then that project will begin.
  • City Supervisor Houk explained that the stainless steel grating for the docks is here and should be installed by the end of the week. The crew has also been adding some non-skid paint at the recreational dock as needed.
  • City Supervisor Houk announced that Justin Moran recently passed his Water Treatment Plant Operator 1 testing which was a huge accomplishment. Mr. Moran also recently received his Professional Operators Endorsement which is something new and he is the first one in this area to have one. Great job Justin!
  • Clerk/Treasurer Roberts explained that she has been working on updating the employee policy manual which included a section for the council. The council section has now been removed and is a stand-alone policy which has been proofed by Mayor Struck and after a few minor changes are made will be sent out to the council for review. Clerk/Treasurer Roberts hopes to have it on the agenda in August for adoption.
  • Assistant Fire Chief McGee noted that they have only had two fire calls in the last two weeks and both were false alarms! Thank goodness!
9. MAYOR’S REPORT

Mayor Struck explained that as a board member of the Association of Washington Cities (AWC) Risk Management Service Agency (RMSA) they have a board retreat every 4 years so she will be out of the office from Wednesday July 26th through Friday July 28th.

10. COUNCIL COMMENTS
  • Councilor Kuiken noted that the fence along the half bridge (Highway 101) is looking very nice as it is getting a painting facelift.
  • Councilor Williams asking about the ability to access the online training through AWC and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts explained that there are currently issues and until they are resolved no one will be able to get to the training they need. She advised she will let everyone know when the training is available.
  • Councilor Williams noted that he thinks that this is probably the best year that the city has ever had as far as mosquitos are concerned. Mayor Struck agreed, but did note that there are still some areas with issues but overall it is much improved. Mayor Struck explained that when Ed Horvath from Three Rivers Mosquito & Vector Control started working for the city he explained that it might take two or three years to get our mosquito issue under control but after that the city should see a major improvement. Mr. Horvath has been extremely proactive going to houses with mosquito issues and finding standing water, tires with water and/or empty flower pots with water and he takes the time to educate the citizen(s) on ways to control them on their own property. Between that and larviciding it is finally making a difference!
  • Councilor Neve agreed that the mosquito problem is much better and noted that for those that know her, know that she has had mosquito issues for a very long time.
  • Councilor Neve thanked Police Chief Eastham and his department for keeping an eye on her place while she is gone. It makes leaving much nicer when you know your home is being watched!
11. EXECUTIVE SESSION – POTENTIAL LITIGATION

Prior to adjourning to Executive Session Mayor Struck advised that no decisions would be made. Mayor Struck called the Executive Session to order at 5:48 PM for 20 minutes for the purpose of potential litigation. Councilor Kuiken, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, City Supervisor Houk, Police Chief Eastham, Michael Tierney and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts were in attendance.

Mayor Struck reconvened the meeting at 6:09 pm.

Executive sessions are done in accordance with RCW 42.30.080

12. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:10 PM to meet again at 5:30 PM on Monday, August 14, 2017 for the next regularly scheduled meeting at South Bend City Hall.

CITY OF SOUTH BEND - COUNCIL MEETING - July 10, 2017
1-2. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

The council meeting was called to order by Mayor Struck at 5:30 pm followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. Members present: Councilor Kuiken, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Webber, Councilor Hall, Police Chief Eastham, City Supervisor Houk, City Attorney Will Penoyar, Assistance Fire Chief McGee and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts.

3. APPROVAL OF AGENDA, CONSENT AGENDA, AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES

A motion was made by Councilor Neve to approve the Agenda, Consent Agenda and the minutes of the June 26, 2017 regular meeting. The motion was seconded by Councilor Webber. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

Vendors – Check #43142 thru Check #43176 - $43,102.28

Payroll - Check #24277 thru Check #24292 – $98,719.35 Including Direct Deposit

4. CORRESPONDENCE

None

5. BID RESULTS – TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT BOARD (TIB) EMERGENCY PAVEMENT REPAIR PROJECT

Mayor Struck presented the bid results for the TIB Emergency Pavement Repair Project which were received on July 6, 2017. The results were:

Naselle Rock and Asphalt Company, Naselle, WA      $44,795.40
Engineer’s Estimate $45,000.00
AA Asphalting, LLC, Sumner, WA $59,944.50
Lakeside Industries, Inc., Aberdeen, WA $67,575.00

 

Councilor Neve expressed her concern about accepting the low bidder after the issues the city had with the low bidder for the Central Avenue Project. Councilor Neve was assured that this project did not have any reconstruction. It would be strictly pothole repair and that Naselle Rock and Asphalt Company was very reputable and have done work for the city in the past and there has never been any issues.

Following a brief discussion Councilor Williams made a motion to accept the bid results as presented and award the project to lower bidder Naselle Rock and Asphalt Company, Naselle, WA. The motion was seconded by Councilor Hall. Vote: Ayes-5, Noes-0, Absent-0

6. ITEMS FROM THE PUBLIC
  • Citizen Shawn Clevenger (711 Minnesota) asked if there would ever be any relief on citizens utility bills. Mr. Clevenger wondered how people, especially senior citizens, pay their bills in South Bend. Mayor Struck explained that the city has done everything that has been possible and there just isn’t anything out there that will help reduce the city’s utility rates. Councilor Williams noted that Mayor Struck has worked very hard to try and get back fill monies but there just is no legislative funding available for completed projects. Citizen Stephanie Serrano (316 Willapa) asked if there were reduced rates for seniors and she was advised that yes the city does offer reduced rates for senior/low income residents. Citizen Jan Davis (215 Alder) asked how many additional houses would the city need to help offset or reduce the current utility rates and Mayor Struck estimated it would take at least 80-100 additional homes.
  • Citizen Daryl Buchanan once again mentioned how nice the trail is maintained (101 and Summit) in South Bend. He noted that there is some interest by several individuals who would like to see the county’s portion of the trail maintained better and those individuals will be meeting at Grays Harbor College in Raymond to try and get it going.
  • Citizen Daryl Buchanan mentioned that he had recently went to the city shop to dump some used oil at the Pacific County’s recycle dump that is located at the city shop. During that time he also went into the shop and spoke with the city crew about mowing and he was advised that the city crew spends a great deal of time mowing ditches and the shoulders of the roads. Mr. Buchanan wasn’t sure that the city had a mower so he was glad to find out that they did. He also spoke briefly about riding his bike in the wood and found out he was trespassing.
  • Mayor Struck took a moment to respectfully request that items from the public be kept to comments, concerns or issues that are relevant to the City of South Bend.
  • Citizen Joe Brignone spoke briefly stating that he is really pleased with the water quality in South Bend.
  • Citizens Kevin & Linda King (514 Pacific) requested that a speed limit sign be put in at the front end of Pacific Avenue to try and help control speeding cars in front of their neighborhood. Ms. King also presented the council and staff a list of neighbors that are also in favor of adding a speed limit sign that is inside the city limits on Pacific Avenue. It was explained by Ms. King that there is currently a speed limit sign at the end of Pacific but it is in the county and mostly hidden by tree branches. Police Chief Eastham agreed that there should be a speed limit sign added to that road. Mayor Struck advised that the city will take a look.
7. DEPARTMENT HEAD REPORTS
  • Police Chief Eastham reported that July 4th was relatively quiet. His department did receive more fireworks complaints than normal, but Police Chief Eastham felt it was because of how the holiday fell this year which stretched out the holiday weekend. Mayor Struck and the council agreed that next year the city needs to do a better job of posting and communication the times when fireworks are legal in South Bend. Pacific County posted incorrect information on their website about the City which lead to some confusion as well. Citizen Linda Buchanan asked if there was something that defined what “safe and sane” fireworks were. Police Chief Eastham advised that anything that is sold at the local fireworks stand is legal and considered “safe and sane”. Citizen Joe Brignone pointed out that bottle rockets never land where they are shot from. Police Chief Eastham noted that the bottom line was that no one was hurt, nothing burned down and there was no damage to the city docks.
  • Police Chief Eastham explained that the investigation of the sexual assault case that Sergeant Stigall reported on at the June 26, 2017 council meeting is complete. The department is waiting on lab results and forensic interviews and the next step will be a trial. The victims are 10 and 13 years old.
  • Clerk/Treasurer Roberts administered the Oath of Office and everyone welcomed newly commissioned Officer Patrick Jo.
  • Councilor Hall asked Police Chief Eastham if his department knew who was responsible for the broken windows on “A” Street. Police Chief Eastham advised that his department knows who is to blame but the parents are denying their child’s involvement so there is not much else that can be done.
  • City Supervisor Houk reported that the garbage truck is again having issues. This time it could be the transmission which could cost $8-$10,000 to repair.
  • City Supervisor Houk explained that there are some wooden grates at the boat launch that have deteriorated and will need to be replaced. The current grates will be replaced with steel and will cost approximately $3,600. There is money in the Dock Fund to cover the cost.
  • City Supervisor Houk noted that the crew has been busy repairing water leaks. When they aren’t working on water leaks they are busy working on the summer maintenance schedule.
8. MAYOR’S REPORT

None

9. COUNCIL COMMENTS
  • Councilor Hall wanted to thank the city crew for mowing from Harrison Avenue towards Raymond on Highway 101. It looks much better and the visibility is greatly improved.
  • Councilor Hall spoke with Fire Chief Todd Strozyk and Councilor Hall was advised that his department would have no issues with gates. They can easily get where they need to go by using tools, if needed, that they always have on board. (See May 22, 2017 Council Minutes)
  • Councilor Neve asked what the status was of the new restaurant at the previous 101 Public House (1015 W Robert Bush Drive). She was advised that is not going to be a restaurant, it is a photography studio & website design company called Emma Rose Company.
  • Councilor Kuiken congratulated Police Chief Eastham on his new officer and that his department is now fully staffed! Councilor Kuiken also thanked the city crew for all of their hard work, it really shows around town.
10. EXECUTIVE SESSION – POTENTIAL LITIGATION

Prior to adjourning to Executive Session Mayor Struck advised that no decisions would be made. Mayor Struck called the Executive Session to order at 6:04 PM for 10 minutes for the purpose of potential litigation. Councilor Kuiken, Councilor Williams, Councilor Neve, Councilor Webber, Councilor Hall, City Supervisor Houk, Police Chief Eastham, City Attorney Will Penoyar and Clerk/Treasurer Roberts were in attendance.

Mayor Struck reconvened the meeting at 6:14 pm.

Executive sessions are done in accordance with RCW 42.30.080

11. ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 6:14 PM to meet again at 5:30 PM on Monday, July 24, 2017 for the next regularly scheduled meeting at South Bend City Hall.